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What foods are in season in autumn?

In partnership with Dr Sandro Demaio

Here's what should be on your autumn grocery list

Credit: nib health insurance

Autumn in Australia is one of the best times of the year. The throng of the festive season is still strong in our memories and the stifling heat of summer has passed, leaving us with fresh mornings and cooler evenings.

And, along with the change in temperature, comes a change in fresh in-season produce.

Not only is eating locally-sourced seasonal produce a great way to help the environment (Environment Victoria estimates out of season produce travels more than 21,000 kilometres before it reaches your kitchen), but it’s often a cheaper option.

Related: Eat for the planet: 4 quick ways to climate hack your diet

So, we’ve partnered with medical doctor and author of cookbook, The Doctor’s Diet, Dr Sandro Demaio to find out what should be on your autumn grocery list, as well as his tips and tricks for cooking delicious autumn produce.

Autumn vegetable shopping list

BeansChilliesPeas
BeetrootCornPotatoes
Bok choyCucumberSilverbeet
BroccoliEggplantSpinach
Brussels sproutsKaleSpring onion
CabbageLeeksSquash
CapsicumLettuceSweet potatoes
CarrotOnionsTomatoes
CauliflowerParsleyZucchini
CeleryParsnips

Not sure how to use this array of autumn veges in everyday cooking? Sandro has some suggestions for simple meals that’ll have the whole family eating their greens – even broccoli and cabbage!

“Broccoli and cauliflower have become very popular in recent years, and with good reason – they’re extremely versatile. Broccoli can be roasted with garlic to make a crunchy, delicious side, or lightly steamed and served in a salad with flaked almonds, feta, olive oil and seasoning. Cauliflower can also be roasted with garlic or spices, like cumin, and turned into a soup, or tossed with barley, walnuts and herbs to make a delicious salad.”

“Cabbage is also a favourite of mine, although it commonly has a bad reputation. When done well, it’s a very cheap and tasty way to get your daily greens. I like to slice it into wedges and pan-fry it with butter and oil, which brings out its sweetness while keeping its shape.”

Related: Za’atar-spiced zucchini and haloumi with hummus

Autumn fruit shopping list

ApplesMelons
FigsOranges
GrapefruitPears
GrapesPomegranates
MandarinsRhubarb
Strawberries

Autumn fruit can be eaten straight from the grocers; fresh apples and strawberries are a great option to snack on in between meals. Alternatively, Sandro explains that you can use autumn fruit as an unexpected, but delicious addition to salads.

“Autumn salads can also be taken up a notch with seasonal pomegranates and figs. Mix green leaves, such as rocket, spinach or kale, with pomegranate or sliced figs; add some goat’s cheese and a drizzle of balsamic vinegar and you have yourself an elegant, yet simple, autumn salad.”

Want more recipe ideas using autumn ingredients? Check out this yummy roasted cauliflower salad with creamy tahini dressing.

Related: Fresh vs frozen: Which vegetables are best?

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Dr Sandro Demaio

In partnership with

Dr Sandro Demaio

Co-host of the ABC TV series ‘Ask the Doctor’, author of 30 scientific papers and ‘The Doctor’s Diet’ (a cookbook based on science), Dr Sandro Demaio is an Aussie medical doctor and global expert on non-communicable diseases.

For more articles by Dr Sandro Demaio, check out The Check Up’s dedicated section.