Skip to content

“Our bodies will literally be dying”: What Everest does to your health

3 minute read
Animated man on Everest feeling the impacts on his health

In October, Paul ‘The Chief’ Harragon, along with a group of former NRL players will be trekking to Everest Base Camp for the Mark Hughes Foundation to raise much needed funds to fight brain cancer.

But, just how tough is the hike up the mountain?

In the 2015 blockbuster Everest, character Rob Hall sets an ominous scene.

“Human beings simply aren't built to function at the cruising altitude of a 747. Okay, once we get above here, above the South Col, our bodies will be literally dying. And I mean literally dying.”

Human beings simply aren't built to function at the cruising altitude of a 747 - *Rob Hall, Everest*

Although our group isn't climbing to the top of the summit like the guys in the movie, the trek to Base Camp will still test the human body.

We’ve put together some facts on what trekking Everest really does to your body – and it’s not for the faint-hearted.

Credit: nibHealthInsurance

For more on the trek, check out our article, Why we’re tackling Everest with the Mark Hughes Foundation to find a cure for brain cancer and head to the Donate Now page to where you can make a difference in the fight against brain cancer.

See all articles

Articles you might also like

The last survivor of Sandakan: Billy Young’s story

We meet with last remaining Sandakan survivor, Billy Young

What is the world’s deadliest animal?

Thought sharks or snakes were most deadly? You thought wrong

Life lessons from people who’ve faced death: Alisha Gooley

Alisha works with brain cancer patients every day

What’s the hottest temperature the human body can cope with?

The body can handle a lot, but how hot is too hot?

The last survivor of Sandakan: Billy Young’s story

We meet with last remaining Sandakan survivor, Billy Young

What is the world’s deadliest animal?

Thought sharks or snakes were most deadly? You thought wrong

Life lessons from people who’ve faced death: Alisha Gooley

Alisha works with brain cancer patients every day

What’s the hottest temperature the human body can cope with?

The body can handle a lot, but how hot is too hot?