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Kendall Jenner painted her wall this colour to help her lose weight, but is there any science?

3 minute read
Woman painting her wall baker-miller pink

It’s not often most of us would take health advice from a Kardashian, so when we found out the youngest of the Kardashian-Jenner clan had painted her house a pink hue because it’s “the only colour scientifically proven to calm you AND suppress your appetite”, we thought we’d do some digging.

The 21-year old model explained on her blog that the pink room came to life after having dinner with some friends who had visited an LA exhibit called Human Condition which featured a room painted with Baker-Miller Pink, a colour which was described as being scientifically able to calm you and suppress your appetite.

But is there any evidence to back this up?

The evidence KJ is speaking of is a series of experiments conducted in the 1970s by Alexander G Schauss of the American Institute for Biosocial Research. Schauss’ aim was to study the effect this hue had on a participant’s mood and behaviour.

The name Baker-Miller Pink comes from the Washington State Department of Corrections’ Commander (Baker) and Warden (Miller), who both agreed to paint the rooms this pink colour so that Schauss could observe the effect it had on inmates.

Schauss found that the colour led to a short-term decrease in aggression and further studies came to the conclusion that being exposed to the hue for 15-minutes could also act as an appetite suppressor.

And, it seems Kendall Jenner isn’t the only one to jump on the Baker-Miller bandwagon.

Experimental adventure brand, Vollebak has released the Baker Miller Pink Hoodie, claiming to be the world’s most relaxing piece of technical clothing. The hoodie uses the Baker-Miller Pink colour to “calm the minds and tranquilize the muscles”

The big questions…

The big question that the research hasn’t answered is – compared to what colour? This also doesn’t take into account someone’s personal association with the colour. A study of the relationship of emotions and colour conducted in 2004 by Kaya and Epps found that for some participants, green and blue represented a peace and tranquillity, but for others blue represented sadness – meaning different colours likely cause different reactions depending on who you are.

Instead of painting your room to manage the amount you eat, there’s some strong science around about listening to your body’s cues. Using a hunger scale like this one from Get Health NSW is a great guide to measuring whether you’re really hungry. Staying in the 3-5 zone, which is when your body is between having ‘slight hunger pains’ and ‘feeling comfortable’, could help you create a healthy relationship with food and lessen that chance you’re going to overeat.

Using apps to track your exercise and diet is another great way to manage your weight. Check out our article 5 free health apps that won’t suck up your smartphone memory for more suggestions.

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