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Mark Hughes: The battle to beat brain cancer

5 minute read

Retiring from rugby league in 2007, premiership-winning Newcastle Knights player Mark Hughes might’ve assumed his body had already faced its fiercest opponents; so, nothing could prepare him for the brain cancer diagnosis that came in July 2013.

Following surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, Mark is currently in remission. However, brain cancer has no cure, so for Mark and other Aussies with this disease, it’s an ongoing battle.

Instead of letting this deadly disease beat him, Mark and his wife Kirralee founded the Mark Hughes Foundation as a way to provide support and research into brain cancer.

This is their story.

Credit: nibHealthInsurance

In October 2017, a group the Mark Hughes Foundation supporters travelled to Nepal to tackle Everest Base Camp. Their aim? To raise money and awareness for brain cancer.

To recognise this initiative, nib employees raised $5,000 and as a result, nib foundation matched this figure and donated a further $5,000. This money will go directly to finding a cure for brain cancer and supporting brain cancer patients.

For all the videos and stories from the trek, visit the dedicated page on The Check Up.

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